The P.R.B. Journal

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Pre-Raphaelite & Victorian Art Exhibitions on view from 2013-2014

An updated list of current and upcoming Pre-Raphaelite  / Symbolist / Victorian art exhibitions.

1 year ago - 1
And When Did You Last See Your Father? The Painting, its Background and Fame
http://www.peacockmirror.com/books/last_see_your_father.html

And When Did You Last See Your Father? The Painting, its Background and Fame

http://www.peacockmirror.com/books/last_see_your_father.html

Portrait photographs by David Wilkie Wynfield

1 year ago

To my feelings about his beautiful photography I owed all my attempts and indeed consequently all my success.

The Victorian photographer Julia Margaret Cameron writing to W.M. Rossetti about the debt she owed to David Wilkie Wynfield (1837-1887), an early pioneer of photography, and a member of the St John’s Wood art clique.

Early Advertising Art from A & E Pears Ltd
http://www.peacockmirror.com/books/early_advertising_art.html

Early Advertising Art from A & E Pears Ltd

http://www.peacockmirror.com/books/early_advertising_art.html

The model for Millais's painting "Bubbles" revisits the painting as an adult

Admiral Sir William James visits the Royal Academy to see the ‘Bubbles' portrait which was painted by his grandfather Sir John Everett Millais.

1 year ago

Lillie Langtry: “Since using Pears’ Soap I have discarded all others”
Harry Furniss’s tramp: “Two years ago I used your soap, since when I have used no other!”

This was a famous Punch cartoon poking fun at celebrities who endorsed Pears Soap in the 19th century: http://www.lordprice.co.uk/SEVN1011-pears.html

Edwin Austin Abbey, 1852-1911, the exhibition catalogue published in 1973.
http://www.peacockmirror.com/books/edwin_austin_abbey.html

Edwin Austin Abbey, 1852-1911, the exhibition catalogue published in 1973.

http://www.peacockmirror.com/books/edwin_austin_abbey.html

Boston Public Library's Arthurian Legend murals by Edwin Austin Abbey

1 year ago

To say that he lived in the past would be only a slight exaggeration, for Abbey’s sense of living history altered his very perceptions of the present. “I never know whether I do really see what I see or not,” he said, “I mean, looking at an old window—suddenly—instantly, if it is suggestive at all, I don’t see that window as it is, at all, but as it might have been, with the people whom it was made for and the people who made it looking through it at each other. Everything old I see that way… I lose all the pleasure a modern should have in the real aspect of real things.”

Quoted from two biographies about Edwin Austin Abbey: the 1973 exhibition catalogue, and the 1921 biography by E.V. Lucas.